Post-Move-In Tips for Your New Apartment

apartmentsNow that the craziness is over and you’ve had a few days to get settled into your new apartment, you can finally breathe a sigh of relief. While the stress of your actual move may be over, there are still a few things that you should take care of after moving to a new place in order to prevent headaches later. Check out these tips that we recommend to new residents:

Read the Lease

Even though you should have already read the lease at the time of the lease signing, it’s not fresh in your mind. Read it, and then read it again. You may have just initialed where you were told to, but you should have received a copy of your lease with your move-in packet or emailed to you. If you did not receive one, ask your landlord or property representative for a copy. Make sure you understand everything you are responsible for, like making sure your rent is turned into the office before the first of the month, not just postmarking it by then. Continue reading

Sharing a Bedroom: Roommate Survival Guide

roommateSharing a bedroom with another person can be difficult, but sometimes it has to be done. If you’ve lived in a dorm, chances are that you have already had to share a room with someone, so you know that it can be stressful. The good news is, it doesn’t have to be! We’ve put together some tips to survive sharing a bedroom with your roommate without going crazy.

Set roommate guidelines from the beginning:

Whether you’re best friends with the person you’re sharing your bedroom with or just meeting them for the first time, guidelines are important. Get together and set some ground rules. A few things to talk about are cleanliness, food, schedules, and guests.

Continue reading

April Fool’s Day Pranks for Your Roommates: A Pinterest Roundup

April 1st is just around the corner, and you know what that means?  Time for some fun April Fool’s pranks.  We’ve rounded up some great April Fool’s pranks from Pinterest that you can use on your roommates.

Disclaimer:  Must attempt pranks at your own risk. MPM is not responsible for any repercussions from these pranks, including (but not limited to) angry roommates, retaliation, loss of friends, and/or broken items.

Photoshop Pranks:

Send them something similar to this in a text.  We would believe it.

Continue reading

Dealing with a Difficult Roommate

Don’t Hate Your Roommate, Work It Out

I’m sure you are already rolling your eyes since “working it out” with a difficult roommate can be tough work.  However, in most cases, it’s easier to work things out than to end things on a sour note.  Here’s some of our advice for getting through your lease with your difficult roommate. Continue reading

Roommates: What to Do When One Suddenly Leaves!

catsIt is common in many medium to larger cities for young adults to live with roommates. While some people would love to have their own places, there are plenty of folks out there who love living with friends or who simply enjoy saving money by living with roommates. Regardless of why you might choose to live with others, roommate “issues” are always seem to pop up here and there, even if you’ve been best pals since kindergarten or live with your sibling (sometimes, it can be worse with siblings!). One issue that some residents with roomies encounter is a roommate moving out in the middle of the lease. Continue reading

Avoid Getting Sick!

The Dos and Don’ts that will steer you clear of seasonal illness this year.

Do

•	Disinfect the sweat at the gymDisinfect the sweat at the gym

  • Don’t be afraid to wipe down equipment before you use it. (To keep the germ spreading to a minimum, please be courteous to other gym goers by wiping off equipment after use as well)

 

Ditch your friendsDitch your friends

  • If your friends are sick, stay away. Encourage them to get better by sleeping, eating well, and drinking lots of fluids.

 

 

Get a thermometerGet a thermometer

  • About a $10 investment, a thermometer will help you determine if your fever is high enough to warrant a doctor visit. (Pro tip: You won’t want to go buy one when you are already sick, so be sure to have one handy.)

 

Keep hand sanitizer with you

  • You are in and out of public places all day. Think of all of the door knobs, elevator buttons and shared surfaces that you and countless others are touching. Use hand sanitizer regularly, but consider one with Aloe Vera to keep your skin from drying out.

 

Get enough sleepGet enough sleep

  • Don’t overwork your body to the point of complete susceptibility. Know your limits to keep your immune system at its best!

 

 

 

Don’t

Wash your dishes where you brush your teethWash your dishes where you brush your teeth

  • Bathrooms are contaminated more easily than other areas. Using the bathroom sink for dishes may have been a thing to do in the dorms, but you have a kitchen now!

 

 

 

 

Share towels

Share towels

  • Towels are a huge breeding ground for infections. Be sure to wash them often!

 

 

 

Share glasses, water bottles or eating utensils

Share glasses, water bottles or eating utensils

  • You know why.

 

 

 

 

 

Hang out with smokersHang out with smokers

  • Second-hand smoke inflames mucus membranes in your throat, making you more vulnerable to infections.

 

 

 

 

 

Let love make you recklessLet love make you reckless

  • Fall is new relationship season; be careful not to swap saliva with someone who has a bug!

Roommates, Shared Space and a Happy Face

These three ideas should define apartment living, but all too often, the dynamic between roommates can change after the honeymoon stage of a live-in friendship has worn off. Cohabitation isn’t the easiest thing to master, but we have a few suggestions to keep in mind as you navigate the ups and downs of sharing your space with others.

The most important aspect of a relationship with your roomies is communication. A lack of good, clear communication is the root of many heated debates and can cause extreme tension between cohabiters.

It might seem silly, but being upfront about your expectations is crucial before moving in with someone.  To make sure everyone remains on the same page, we recommend reviewing these expectations within the first week of living in your new home.  Setting ground rules makes it much easier to have a mutual understanding of your shared space, and exceptions to these rules can always be discussed on a case-by-case basis when unique circumstances arise.

Conflict can occur, even between the most amicable of roommates.  If a roomie does something that irks you, it’s important to address the issue right away so resentment doesn’t build over time.  Although it’s important to be open and honest, we recommend doing so with a conversation rather than a confrontation.   Whether it’s asking your roommates to check with you before throwing a party on a Tuesday night or having a conversation about which food items you are and aren’t willing to share, your roommates are much more likely to understand your point of view if you talk with them respectfully.  Along the same lines, be open to a little constructive criticism from your cohabiters and be and willing to compromise or make some changes in your behavior.Roommates

The following are little tricks you and your roommates can implement to maintain positive communication in your household:

Cleaning/Chores

  • Create a chore chart so each person can clearly see what needs to be done.
  • Assign permanent duties for each person. (e.g. you will always clean this and your roommate will always clean ) This system will ensure that responsibilities are clear and easy to remember.
  • Set clear expectations for when regular cleaning should occur.
  • Clean up after yourself.

makeupBathroom usage and Organization

  • Talk about schedules and come up with a routine so your roommate isn’t late to work because he or she has to wait for you to finish your 30 minute shower in the morning.
  • Make sure each person has a designated shelf/drawer/etc. so finding your own toiletries is easy.
  • Have a caddy or bin that you can easily access so you can take part of your morning routine into your bedroom as needed.
  • Be courteous of your roommates’ privacy, and understand that their hygiene routines may be different from yours.

Kitchen Use

  • Decide if you and your roomies will buy food together and share it or if you’d prefer to keep your groceries separate. Either option can work well (as long as all parties are on the same page).
  • Talk about doing dishes, sharing appliances, filling water pitchers, re-stocking ice cube trays, and other shared responsibilities.

Paying Bills

  • If you are sharing and splitting bills, make a calendar that denotes when bills are due.
  • Stick to payment deadlines.
  • Have a white board on your fridge where you can clearly write out/divide the bills so each person knows exactly how much he or she owes and why.

Shared Space– Parallel play

  • You don’t have to hide out in your own bedroom to do something that you want to do alone, and it’s important to feel comfortable near your roommates without feeling the need to partake in their every activity. A great way to hang out together while still taking some time for yourself is called parallel play. Realize that it is completely okay to be in the same room with your roommates while doing different things.  Parallel play can even be a bonding experience of sorts.

If you and your roomies utilize some of these tips this year, we’re confident that your living experience will be a great one!

 

Best Friends Make the Best Roommates? Not so fast…

It’s that time a year again, where students rush to get their housing for next year locked down and compete for leases in the best spots on campus. Finding a place to live is only half the battle, however, as your new home won’t be a very fun place if you aren’t compatible with the people you share it with. While you may think that living with your BFF is a great idea, differences in lifestyle and conflict resolution could turn them into your worst enemy. Here are a few tips from Madison Property Management and backing those up are MPM resident Olivia Johnson with some roommate experiences of her own. Continue reading